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Loo Wit The Fire Keeper: A Mythical Tale of Mountains and Volcanoes



Loo Wit The Fire Keeper Summary: A Native American Myth




Have you ever wondered how some of the mountains in the Pacific Northwest were formed? Or why Mount St. Helens is an active volcano? If you are curious about these questions, you might be interested in reading a Native American myth called "Loo Wit The Fire Keeper". This myth tells the story of two brothers who quarreled over land and a beautiful woman named Loo Wit, and how their actions angered the Creator who punished them by turning them into mountains. In this article, we will summarize the plot, characters, and themes of this fascinating myth.




Loo Wit The Fire Keeper Summary


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Introduction




What is a myth?




A myth is a traditional story that usually involves gods, heroes, or supernatural beings, and that explains some aspect of the natural world or human culture. Myths are often passed down orally from generation to generation, and they reflect the beliefs and values of the people who tell them. Myths can also serve as entertainment, inspiration, or guidance for people who listen to them.


What is the story of Loo Wit The Fire Keeper?




"Loo Wit The Fire Keeper" is a Native American myth that belongs to the Chinook tribe, who live in the region of present-day Washington and Oregon. The myth explains how three mountains - Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood, and Mount Adams - were formed by the Creator as a result of a conflict between two brothers and a woman named Loo Wit. The myth also explains why Mount St. Helens is an active volcano that sometimes erupts.


Main Body




The conflict between the brothers




How they divided the land




The story begins with two brothers who were chiefs of their respective tribes. They were always quarreling over land and resources, and they could not agree on how to share them peacefully. One day, the Creator decided to intervene and settle their dispute. He gave each brother a bow and an arrow, and told them to shoot them into the air. Wherever their arrows landed, that would be their territory. The brothers agreed to this plan, and shot their arrows in opposite directions. One brother's arrow landed on the north side of the Columbia River, and the other brother's arrow landed on the south side. The Creator then built a bridge across the river as a sign of peace, and told them to live in harmony.


How they fought over Loo Wit




For a while, the brothers and their tribes lived happily and peacefully. They could visit each other by crossing the bridge, and they enjoyed trading and socializing. However, things changed when they met Loo Wit, an old woman who lived alone in a hut near the bridge. She was the only person on earth who still had fire, because she was not greedy or quarrelsome like the others. She kept her fire burning day and night, and she shared it with anyone who needed it.


One day, the Creator visited Loo Wit and asked her what she wished for. She said she wished to be young and beautiful, so that she could have a husband and children. The Creator granted her wish, and turned her into a stunning woman. When the brothers saw her, they were both smitten by her beauty, and they wanted to marry her. They started to argue and fight over her, and they forgot about their promise of peace. They also neglected their tribes, who suffered from hunger and cold. The Creator saw their behavior and was displeased.


The role of the Creator




How he gave and took away fire




The Creator was the supreme being who created the world and everything in it. He was also the one who gave fire to the people, so that they could cook, warm themselves, and see in the dark. He expected them to use fire wisely and respectfully, and to share it with others. However, he noticed that the people became greedy and selfish, and they started to fight over fire. They also used fire to destroy the land and the animals. The Creator was angry and disappointed, and he decided to take away fire from everyone, except for Loo Wit. He made the sky dark, the weather cold, and the rain fall. He hoped that this would teach the people a lesson, and make them appreciate fire again.


How he turned the brothers and Loo Wit into mountains




The Creator was also the one who punished the brothers and Loo Wit for their actions. He saw that they were causing trouble and suffering for themselves and others, and he wanted to put an end to it. He appeared before them and asked them to stop fighting over Loo Wit, and to return to their tribes. He told them that Loo Wit did not belong to either of them, but to him. He also told them that he would turn them into mountains, so that they could watch over their people and protect them. The brothers did not listen to him, and they continued to fight. The Creator then turned them into mountains as he said. One brother became Mount Hood in Oregon, and the other brother became Mount Adams in Washington. They were separated by the Columbia River, which was once the bridge of peace.


As for Loo Wit, she was heartbroken by the trouble that her beauty had caused. She did not want to be a young woman anymore, but she also did not want to be an old woman again. She asked the Creator to turn her into something else. The Creator agreed, and turned her into a mountain too. She became Mount St. Helens, which stood between Mount Hood and Mount Adams. She was still beautiful, but she was also lonely and sad. Sometimes, she would erupt in anger or sorrow, sending smoke and ash into the air.


The meaning and message of the myth




How it explains natural phenomena




One of the purposes of myths is to explain natural phenomena that people do not understand or cannot control. "Loo Wit The Fire Keeper" is a myth that explains how three mountains in the Pacific Northwest were formed by the Creator as a result of a human conflict. It also explains why Mount St. Helens is an active volcano that sometimes erupts violently. The myth gives a supernatural explanation for these natural events, based on the beliefs and values of the Chinook tribe.


How it teaches moral lessons




Another purpose of myths is to teach moral lessons that people can learn from or apply to their own lives. "Loo Wit The Fire Keeper" is a myth that teaches several moral lessons, such as: - Peace is better than war: The brothers were happier when they lived in peace than when they fought over land or Loo Wit. Their fighting caused misery for themselves and their people. - Greed is harmful: The brothers were greedy for land, fire, and Loo Wit. Their greed made them forget their promise of peace, neglect their duties as chiefs, and anger the Creator. - Beauty is not everything: Loo Wit wished for beauty, but it did not bring her happiness or love. It only brought her trouble and sorrow. - Fire is precious: Fire was a gift from the Creator that helped people survive and thrive. However, people took it for granted and abused it. They lost fire as a punishment for their behavior. - Respect the Creator: The Creator was the source of life and power in the world. He expected people to respect him and his creation, and to follow his rules. He rewarded those who were good, like Loo Wit before her wish, and punished those who were bad, like the brothers after their quarrel.


Conclusion




Summary of the main points




Summary of the main points




In conclusion, "Loo Wit The Fire Keeper" is a Native American myth that tells the story of two brothers who quarreled over land and a woman named Loo Wit, and how their actions angered the Creator who punished them by turning them into mountains. The myth explains how three mountains in the Pacific Northwest were formed, and why Mount St. Helens is an active volcano. The myth also teaches moral lessons about peace, greed, beauty, fire, and respect for the Creator.


Five unique FAQs




Question


Answer


Who are the main characters in "Loo Wit The Fire Keeper"?


The main characters are two brothers who were chiefs of their tribes, Loo Wit who was an old woman turned into a young beauty, and the Creator who was the supreme being.


What tribe does the myth belong to?


The myth belongs to the Chinook tribe, who live in the region of present-day Washington and Oregon.


What are the names of the three mountains that were formed by the Creator?


The three mountains are Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood, and Mount Adams.


Why did Loo Wit still have fire when everyone else lost it?


Loo Wit still had fire because she was not greedy or quarrelsome like the others. She kept her fire burning day and night, and she shared it with anyone who needed it.


What is the theme of "Loo Wit The Fire Keeper"?


The theme of the myth is that people are never satisfied. They always want more than what they have, and they cause trouble and suffering for themselves and others.


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